The University of Massachusetts-Lowell, the second-largest degree-granting institution in its state, offers a handful of online undergraduate degrees. These include fully online bachelor's pathways in business administration, management, English, liberal arts, and psychology -- along with a degree in information technology with a business minor. Other bachelor's degrees at UMass Lowell, such as the RN-to-BSN track and engineering fields, are available in a blended format. The school also offers 12 master's degrees and a doctorate in educational leadership fully online.

Attending online class is easy, all you need is a reliable internet connection. You simply log into your classroom to complete assignments, access course materials and resources and interact with faculty and classmates. Class participation is graded based upon your contributions to online discussions. This is a great solution for students who might have a difficult time commuting and for those who learn better independently.
Attending an accredited school is one of the best decisions that a student can make. Accreditation is a designation awarded to a school for complying with a set of academic and personal support standards. Students who need financial aid, hope to earn certification or licensure as a teacher, and who may want to attend graduate school or transfer credits must attend an online school that is accredited. All individuals seeking a teaching credential must attend an education program that is recognized by their state’s board of education.
The 1930s witnessed the appearance of first interdisciplinary major: American studies. Culture was the grounding concept and orchestrating principle for its courses.[2] 1960s to 1970s experienced a new tide of interdisciplinary majors and a relaxation of curriculum and graduation requirements. (Civil Rights Movement spawned Women’s studies and Black Studies, for example.) [3] In the 1980s and 1990s, "interdisciplinary studies, multiculturalism, feminist pedagogy, and a renewed concern for the coherence and direction of the undergraduate program began to assail the Baccalaureate degree dominated by the academic major."[2]
Fort Hays State boasts numerous accolades for its online degrees and virtual college. Several of the school's online bachelor's pathways serve as degree completion programs geared toward transfer students with an associate degree; most students complete these tracks in two years or less. Additionally, some programs carry a foreign language coursework requirement.
If you have a creative bent, then you know that it can be more difficult to find online programs that match your interests. The Savannah College of Art and Design—a private, nonprofit university— has addressed this need by offering high-quality online programs tailored to meet the needs of nontraditional students. And their programs, offered at the undergraduate and graduate level—have found their way to national rankings.  
If you’re interested in Photography, you may enjoy related majors including Animation & Video Graphics; Audiovisual Technician; Commercial & Advertising Art; Communications Technologies/Technicians and Support Services; Communications Technology/Technician; Computer Graphics; Computer Media Applications; Computer Typography and Composition Equipment Operator; Design & Visual Communications; Design and Applied Arts; Film/Video & Cinematography; General Graphic Communications; Graphic and Printing Equipment Operator, General Production; Graphic Design; Illustration; Intermedia/Multimedia; Other Graphic Communications; Photographic and Film/ Video Technology/Technician and Assistant; Platemaker/Imager; Printing Management; Printing Press Operator; Publishing & Digital Imaging; Radio & Television Technician; Recording Arts Technology; and Web Design.
Core classes in the education program explore the structure of public education, major topics and issues in public education, cultural effects on student achievement, education around the world, and the political state of education. Other classes explore curriculum development, evaluation techniques, and teaching techniques. To earn a four-year degree in education, students also take a number of general courses in math,biology, the arts, and the humanities.
Liberal arts studies, in general, get a bad rap when it comes to career utility. Classics is one major that proves that old trope wrong. Sure, the study of ancient Greek and Roman culture might not seem exactly applicable in the modern job market, but the level of critical thinking and research skills required to do it is highly marketable in a wide range of industries. For example, former classics majors from Georgetown University have gone on to careers in publishing, government, museums, finance and education, to name just a few fields, according to the school’s career education center. Many also continue their schooling and pursue graduate degrees in a variety of subjects, including ancient history and classical archaeology, as well as law and medicine, for which they tend to have high admissions rates.
A private institution with religious affiliations, LeTourneau University offers several online pathways for students seeking degrees in aviation science. The school offers online undergraduate degrees in aircraft dispatch, aviation management, aviation security, and remotely piloted aircraft. Other online degree options include a bachelor's in business administration with multiple majors/concentrations, several theology pathways, and an RN-to-BSN track. The school also offers 12 online master's degrees, most concentrated in teacher education, that cater to online students.
For us onlooking or partaking upperclassmen, that feeling isn’t too distant. As a freshman, the sense of being lost in a big new world was exciting, but at the same time I treasured every bit of advice I could get. And there are still many things I wish I would have known then. Now that I’m a few years older, I thought I’d share some thoughts. More importantly, I went around and asked some of the most accomplished Penn students for what recommendations they’d give to freshmen.
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