Students choose to study through the University of Idaho's distance learning program for different reasons, with independent study being among the most popular. The independent study online program allows students to study at their own pace while in individual courses or a degree program. One of the most popular fields of study for online students at the University of Idaho is their graduate engineering program. There are currently eight different master's degrees in engineering offered that can be completed entirely online, ideal for students who have a busy work schedule or family life. Another online option is their summer session which allows students to study the same quality courses in half the time. The summer session offers in-state tuition to all students, making it one of the fastest and cheapest ways to earn your degree online.
Offered by a few select universities such as Harvard, Yale and Stanford, this policy is a hybrid of early action and early decision. Like early action, students will hear back early (usually in December) and those who are accepted are not obligated to enroll. On top of that, like early decision, students cannot apply to any other colleges via early admission. They can, however, apply to colleges through the non-binding regular process.

Request official transcripts from all colleges or universities you have previously attended. Have them mailed to the college of DCCCD you want to attend. (Transcripts must be no older than three years from the date they were printed.) Many courses have prerequisites that must be met before registering. As a result, students who have not submitted transcripts may not be able to register for all desired classes.
It may be easier to get into an open enrollment college, but that doesn't necessarily mean the actual work is easy once you start. College coursework is challenging and rigorous at any properly accredited school, regardless of whether its open enrollment or not. Also, regionally accredited colleges typically accept transfer credits from other regionally accredited colleges, and this wouldn't be the case if there were any doubts about the quality of education.

Between 2000 and 2017, overall college enrollment rates increased for both young adult males (from 33 to 37 percent) and young adult females (from 38 to 44 percent). Among males, college enrollment rates were higher in 2017 than in 2000 for Black (33 vs. 25 percent) and Hispanic (31 vs. 18 percent) young adults. Among females, college enrollment rates were also higher in 2017 than in 2000 for White (44 vs. 41 percent) and Hispanic (41 vs. 25 percent) young adults. The rates in 2017 were not measurably different from the rates in 2000 for White young adult males and Black young adult females.
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