Arkansas State University-Mountain Home, founded July 1, 1995, graduated a class of more than 100 students for the first time in 2001. Today's graduation rates are nearly 10 percent higher than the college average in the state. ASU-MH students also benefit from one of the most affordable tuition rates in Arkansas. More than 20 associate degrees, ranging from agriculture to welding, are available on campus. Students can also complete online college programs leading to undergraduate and graduate degrees or professional certificates, including the popular RN-BSN nursing program. There are eight bachelor degrees available online, 15 master's degrees, five post-graduate education degrees and eight certificates. Online students at ASU-MH are also eligible to apply for financial aid and flexible payment options.

This for-profit university has campus locations in Colorado Springs, Denver, and Aurora. The school operates primarily as an online college. Founded in 1965, Colorado Technical University began as a vocational training school for individuals with military backgrounds. Today, this university features a military education department and offers online associate, bachelor's, and master’s programs with eight start dates throughout the year. Transfer students with an associate degree can earn a bachelor’s degree in 17 months.
Richard Winton is a crime writer for the Los Angeles Times and part of the team that won the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service in 2011. Known as @lacrimes on Twitter, during 20 years at The Times he also has been part of the breaking news staff that won Pulitzers in 1998 and 2004. He won the ASNE Deadline News award in 2006. A native of England, after getting degrees from University of Kent at Canterbury and University of Wisconsin-Madison, he began covering politics but chose a life of crime because it was less dirty.   
From 2000 to 2017, college enrollment rates increased for Black (from 31 to 36 percent) and Hispanic (from 22 to 36 percent) young adults. The rates in 2017 were also higher than in 2000 for White (41 vs. 39 percent) and Asian (65 vs. 56 percent) young adults.3 The rate was not measurably different between 2000 and 2017 for American Indian/Alaska Native young adults. More recently, college enrollment rates were higher in 2017 than in 2010 for Hispanic (36 vs. 32 percent) young adults and lower in 2017 than in 2010 for White (41 vs. 43 percent) and American Indian/Alaska Native (20 vs. 41 percent) young adults. There was no measurable difference between the 2010 and 2017 college enrollment rates for young adults who were Black, Asian, Pacific Islander, and of Two or more races.
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