3 Separate data for young adults who were Pacific Islander or of Two or more races were not available in 2000. Prior to 2003, data for Asian young adults included Pacific Islander young adults. Information from Digest of Education Statistics 2017, table 101.20, based on the Census Bureau Current Population Reports, indicates that 96 percent of all Asian/Pacific Islander 18- to 24-year-olds are Asian.

In light of the information you glean from your guidance counselor, you should begin early in your high school career to explore in depth the academic options and learning environments available to you. Part of this step must include self-awareness of your career and academic goals. No, you don’t have to know what you want to “be” the rest of your life. Plenty of students go to college without a solid career goal, others know their strengths and weaknesses and are open to exploring options. Most colleges don’t require you declare a major until your sophomore year.
Students at Pitt Community College are set up for success with the school's core values. With a commitment to student learning, workforce development, and student and community engagement, Pitt Community College offers one of the most affordable curriculums around. With a variety of financial aid options, students can choose from day, night, work-based, and online courses. Online programs can be found through the school's online learning, which is possibly the most affordable and fun, and, to top it off, convenient. All online courses are led by expert instructors, many of whom are nationally known authors. Pitt Community College also allows high school juniors and seniors to enroll in courses tuition free, based on the schools' Career and College Promise Program. Pitt also makes it easy for out-of-state students by offering distance learning. Pitt students can also enjoy a variety of athletics, clubs and organizations and community programs.
Bellevue's undergraduate applicants enjoy a rolling deadline for open enrollment into programs in four academic areas: arts and sciences, business, information technology, and professional studies. Students applying to bachelor's programs are required to submit proof of a high school diploma or GED and pay a one-time application fee of $50. Graduate applicants may be required to uphold a minimum GPA requirement in addition to submitting all prior transcripts and work experience.
To determine the best online colleges and universities with open admissions, we examined the most important factors for prospective students, mainly common predictors of future success and a school’s commitment to online programs. This boils down to admissions rate, student loan default rate, retention rate, graduation rate, and the percent of students enrolled in online classes. All data points are taken from information provided by colleges and universities to the National Center for Education Statistics.
Northwest Mississippi Community College blossomed from the system of rural Mississippi farm high schools that began offering college-level courses in 1926. Today, Northwest has grown into four campuses with an enrollment exceeding 6,200 students. The first online courses at Northwest were offered in 1999. By design, online classes at this college are among the most-affordable online programs in the state, offering the same tuition rate as their on-campus classes. Online students can complete coursework via Canvas, a class management system that allows for classroom participation and access to course materials, research projects, homework and presentations. Full associate degrees can be completed online in majors including accountancy, business administration, marketing communications/public relations management, office administration, criminal justice, general college, psychology, social work, liberal arts, elementary education, business and computer teacher education. Northwest recommends that online students devote eight hours per online course each week.

Apply for financial assistance, if applicable, by calling the school's aid office. The school can provide you with information on all loans available to you, as well as any grants or scholarships for which you qualify. The most common type of federal loan application is the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, which you can access on the Internet.
Cities closest to Tempe, Arizona are Mesa and Phoenix. Arts, sports and outdoor events are all part of the culture in Tempe, but the city is really known for Arizona State University-Tempe, one of the most affordable research schools that promotes innovation and leadership. In addition to 17 schools, the university operates more than a dozen centers and institutions. Nursing and health innovation, law, engineering, business and mass communication are among the school's majors, and many of these majors can be completed online. Cost to earn a certificate starts at $490 per credit, and each credit to earn a graduate degree starts at $512. Undergraduate students can expect to pay $510 per credit and up. Scholarships, grants and student loans can help students offset the cost of tuition.
Located in El Dorado, South Arkansas Community College was established in 1992. Today, it offers its 1,481 enrolled students a selection from nine associate degrees and over 40 certificates in health sciences, business and technology, career technical education and liberal arts. It offers one of the most affordable tuition rates in the region, with 80 percent of the SACC students receiving financial aid to pay for their education. The college's most popular majors are from the allied health sciences: nursing, physical therapy assistantship, practical nursing and occupational therapy assistantship. Students can complete their associate degrees and certificates entirely online through the online college program at SACC. Access to online courses and technical support is available 24/7 though the college's Blackboard class management software program.

Online college admission requirements emphasize inclusion, therefore, policies that rely on selective measures, such as previous academic achievement, do not exist. Students who excelled in high school and are applying to an open enrollment college have the added benefit of receiving credits for introductory courses and accelerating their degree. Although a minimum GPA is usually not required for admission to an open enrollment college, students are often required to maintain a minimum college GPA once admitted. For example, some schools may require students to earn a minimum 1.75 GPA to graduate. Typically, students must earn a 2.0 GPA or better in their major to receive their degree.

Considered to be one of the top online schools in the nation to earn a bachelor's degree, Oregon State University has no shortage of options for online students. With over 1,100 courses offered entirely online and over 45 degrees offered, students who study at the online school have plenty of educational resources to get a solid college education. While some students choose to study toward a degree entirely online, some students only want to supplement their traditional education with individual online courses. But no matter which option students are looking for, all courses and degree programs guarantee the same high-quality education that's offered on-campus. An online degree is also the most affordable way to earn a degree in Oregon when taking into account all the fees associated with studying on campus.

Before your official transcripts arrive, complete an application for admission and a conditional admissions form promising that you will provide official transcripts. If you have "student copies" of your transcripts or grade reports, bring them with you when you visit our offices so our academic advisors can use them to assist you. (Find out more about transfer requirements.)


The percentage of American college students who are Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Black has been increasing. From fall 1976 to fall 2016, the percentage of Hispanic students rose from 4 percent to 18 percent of all U.S. residents enrolled in degree-granting postsecondary institutions, and the percentage of Asian/Pacific Islander students rose from 2 percent to 7 percent. The percentage of Black students increased from 10 percent in 1976 to 14 percent in 2016, but the 2016 percentage reflects a decrease since 2011, when Black students made up 15 percent of all enrolled U.S. residents. The percentage of American Indian/Alaska Native students was higher in 2016 (0.8 percent) than in 1976 (0.7 percent). During the same period, the percentage of White students fell from 84 percent to 57 percent. About 4 percent of students in 2016 were of Two or more races. Race/ethnicity is not reported for nonresident aliens, who made up 5 percent of total enrollment in 2016.
Not all students are rock stars, and that's OK – some do alright, while others need a little more support. Students with less than stellar high school grades may be more productive – and comfortable – at an open enrollment college, where the environment isn't competitive and coursework is challenging but not impossible. Attending an open enrollment college first can also be a great way to prepare for a more selective four-year college.
Open enrollment, sometimes called open admission, means a college's only admission criteria is that students have a high school diploma or GED. That's right – the school will accept all applicants with proof of successful high school completion or the equivalent. Space may be limited, though, so if there are more applicants than available seats, some may be waitlisted.
Enrollment trends have differed at the undergraduate and postbaccalaureate levels. Undergraduate enrollment increased 47 percent between fall 1970 and fall 1983, when it reached 10.8 million. Undergraduate enrollment dipped to 10.6 million in 1984 and 1985, but then increased each year from 1985 to 1992, rising 18 percent before stabilizing between 1992 and 1998. Undergraduate enrollment was 11 percent higher in 2016 (16.9 million) than in 2006 (15.2 million). This overall change reflects a 19 percent increase in undergraduate enrollment between 2006 and 2010 (when undergraduate enrollment reached 18.1 million), followed by a 7 percent decrease between 2010 and 2016. Postbaccalaureate enrollment increased 34 percent between 1970 and 1984, with most of this increase occurring in the early and mid-1970s. Postbaccalaureate enrollment increased from 1985 to 2016, rising a total of 80 percent. During the last decade of this period, between 2006 and 2016, postbaccalaureate enrollment rose 15 percent, from 2.6 million to 3.0 million. Unlike undergraduate enrollment, which was lower in 2016 than in 2010, postbaccalaureate enrollment was higher in 2016 than in 2010.
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