It may be easier to get into an open enrollment college, but that doesn't necessarily mean the actual work is easy once you start. College coursework is challenging and rigorous at any properly accredited school, regardless of whether its open enrollment or not. Also, regionally accredited colleges typically accept transfer credits from other regionally accredited colleges, and this wouldn't be the case if there were any doubts about the quality of education.
Go through the admissions process after you have narrowed down the college that you want to attend for online classes. In general, you may need the school to classify you as either degree-seeking or non-degree seeking for administrative purposes. Many schools provide instructions for admissions online, but prospective students can get assistance from admissions counselors as well, via online chat, telephone conversation or visiting the campus in person.
The overall college enrollment rate has increased since 2000. Different factors, such as changes in the labor market and the economy, may have contributed to this increase.1, 2 In this indicator, college enrollment rate is defined as the percentage of 18- to 24-year-olds (referred to as “young adults”) enrolled as undergraduate or graduate students in 2- or 4-year institutions. The Immediate College Enrollment Rate indicator, in contrast, presents data on the percentage of high school completers who enroll in 2- or 4-year institutions in the fall immediately following high school.
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