More than 36,000 students attend the University of Alabama, one of the most affordable schools in the nation. The university's main campus is located in Tuscaloosa, where the Gorgas House Museum, Capitol Park and Bryant Denny Stadium can be found. Over half of the school's students come from outside of Alabama, and football keeps the university in front of millions of people. There are 12 schools to choose a major from, including the Community Health Sciences school, Nursing, Law, Engineering and Graduate school. Prospective students can save money on tuition by qualifying to enroll in the school as an in-state student. For those needing additional monetary support, there is financial assistance in the form of scholarships, grants, student loans and work-study programs.
In addition to providing employment outlook information, PayScale publishes the annual College Salary Report. This report includes median entry-level and mid-career salaries for employees based on their undergraduate major. Additionally, PayScale ranks the best schools for nine general major fields, including business, education, and the humanities. Students can also learn about salary expectations through the BLS, which publishes median annual earnings for all occupations and state-based salary data for different careers.
The percentage of American college students who are Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Black has been increasing. From fall 1976 to fall 2016, the percentage of Hispanic students rose from 4 percent to 18 percent of all U.S. residents enrolled in degree-granting postsecondary institutions, and the percentage of Asian/Pacific Islander students rose from 2 percent to 7 percent. The percentage of Black students increased from 10 percent in 1976 to 14 percent in 2016, but the 2016 percentage reflects a decrease since 2011, when Black students made up 15 percent of all enrolled U.S. residents. The percentage of American Indian/Alaska Native students was higher in 2016 (0.8 percent) than in 1976 (0.7 percent). During the same period, the percentage of White students fell from 84 percent to 57 percent. About 4 percent of students in 2016 were of Two or more races. Race/ethnicity is not reported for nonresident aliens, who made up 5 percent of total enrollment in 2016.
Offered by a few select universities such as Harvard, Yale and Stanford, this policy is a hybrid of early action and early decision. Like early action, students will hear back early (usually in December) and those who are accepted are not obligated to enroll. On top of that, like early decision, students cannot apply to any other colleges via early admission. They can, however, apply to colleges through the non-binding regular process.
University of Maryland University College Online offers more than 90 academic programs, with more than 25 locations in the U.S. and more than 140 extended campuses worldwide. As one of the country's open admission colleges, the only admissions requirement for undergraduate students is to provide proof of a high school diploma or GED; no standardized test scores or minimum GPA is required to qualify for enrollment. Prospective graduate students are required to have a bachelor's degree from an accredited higher learning institution to be granted admission into an advanced program.
Many students these days are looking for the cheapest way to get a college education and find that community colleges and online programs are a great way to cut costs. Allen Community College (AllenCC) is no exception, as they strive to be one of the most affordable community colleges in the state of Kansas. In addition to outside financial aid, in-house payment plans, several AllenCC scholarship opportunities are available, with qualifiers such as merit, financial need, athletic achievement, early start dual enrollment and employee status. For those juggling family, full-time work and other obligations, flexibility is key, and ACC offers hybrid, fully online and eight-week courses, with on-campus classes offered at two locations. Students planning to pursue further education at a four-year college can focus on a general, academic-based associate degree and those planning to enter the workforce as soon as possible can go for a career-oriented degree in fields such as allied health, early education and criminal justice.
Arizona Western College (AWC) has quite a variety of options for students needing a flexible schedule to achieve their educational goals. Some choices include traditional on-campus, Interactive Television Network (ITN), weekend, night, late-start, four-week, weekend, hybrid and completely online college courses, plus several campus locations in the area, serving two counties. Academic programs here are designed for students that plan to transfer to a four-year institution, while occupational programs are career-oriented, with associate degrees or certifications in areas such as health care, public safety, construction, technology, culinary and hospitality. Tuition at AWC is quite reasonable, with non-residents paying only ten dollars more per credit than Arizonians, a special rate for students from WUE states, a reduced tuition rate to students over 60 years of age and credits for military experience. The cheapest tuition option is the Early College Experience plan, for high schoolers aged 17 and under, who can earn college credit through AWC at a greatly reduced per-credit rate.
University of Arkansas-Pulaski Technical College of North Little Rock serves more than 6,000 students through five campus locations. Prospective students will be happy to know UA-PTC's per-hour tuition rate is among the cheapest in the state. Since 1992, it has granted over 18,000 degrees and certificates since 1992 while also preparing students who want to pursue higher degrees. UA-PTC online college degree programs can help students transfer to four-year colleges and universities or can lead to completion of technical and occupational programs. The college also awards academic credit based on prior training or life experiences. Popular degree and certification programs are available in allied health and human services, business and information technology, culinary arts and hospitality management, fine arts and humanities, science and mathematics, and technical sciences. Online courses are delivered via the Blackboard class management software.
Trinity Valley Community College, founded in 1946, serves five county areas in Texas with multiple campuses and online education programs. Its associate degree programs are accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. Degree and certificate programs are offered in the divisions of arts, humanities and social sciences; business and technology; health sciences; public services; science, engineering and mathematics; and service and production industry. TVCC's online college degree programs lead to the associate of arts degree, for students planning to transfer to a four-year school, and an associate of applied science degree, for students completing two years of career training. Tuition is among the most affordable in the state, but students may also apply for scholarships, loans, work study, grants, or tuition waivers.
Go through the admissions process after you have narrowed down the college that you want to attend for online classes. In general, you may need the school to classify you as either degree-seeking or non-degree seeking for administrative purposes. Many schools provide instructions for admissions online, but prospective students can get assistance from admissions counselors as well, via online chat, telephone conversation or visiting the campus in person.

Hutchinson Community College (HCC) is a two-year college that offers the best of both worlds. First time students can get the full college campus experience, with on-campus classes, athletic events, activities, clubs, organizations and dorm living, while others can go at their own speed with the ability to build their college education around outside obligations, such as work or family, with online and hybrid courses. The Online Education division at HCC has online programs and courses designed with freedom and flexibility in mind from individual hybrid and online courses to fully online degree programs. Specialty certificates in fields such heath coding and transcription, pharmacy technology, accounting and office support are available online, along with associate degrees in areas such as general education, accounting, business, criminal justice, early education, paralegal and health information management. For students needing help finding the most affordable way to achieve their educational goals, HCC offers financial advising and counseling every step of the way, with customized financial plans, loan entrance and exit counseling and HCC scholarships.
For some students, academics isn't a strength but they still have career goals that require a higher education. Or maybe a student isn't quite ready for a competitive four-year college but still wants to work towards earning a degree. Students who feel this way may benefit from an open enrollment college. Find out how open enrollment works and get expert advice to help you decide if this is the right educational path for you.

To accurately evaluate a university's reputation, students should look beyond the school's official homepage. Many renowned publications, such as U.S. News & World Report, publish objective, data-driven annual rankings of schools based on undergraduate and graduate degree majors, online programs, and other criteria. Prospective students can also use the Integrated Postsecondary Education System to view school data and compare institutions based on graduation rates and other key student outcomes.

The percentage of American college students who are Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Black has been increasing. From fall 1976 to fall 2016, the percentage of Hispanic students rose from 4 percent to 18 percent of all U.S. residents enrolled in degree-granting postsecondary institutions, and the percentage of Asian/Pacific Islander students rose from 2 percent to 7 percent. The percentage of Black students increased from 10 percent in 1976 to 14 percent in 2016, but the 2016 percentage reflects a decrease since 2011, when Black students made up 15 percent of all enrolled U.S. residents. The percentage of American Indian/Alaska Native students was higher in 2016 (0.8 percent) than in 1976 (0.7 percent). During the same period, the percentage of White students fell from 84 percent to 57 percent. About 4 percent of students in 2016 were of Two or more races. Race/ethnicity is not reported for nonresident aliens, who made up 5 percent of total enrollment in 2016.

With that said and done, you and your parents should plan time to sit down to fill out the form. Be warned: whether you do it in hardcopy or online, the application length and imperviousness has been compared to that of a complex federal income tax form. You will have to go online beforehand and apply for an online access PIN. Materials to have handy while you’re filling out the form are your most recent income tax forms, pay stubs, figures associated with home mortgage and auto loans, bank statement, and social security and driver license numbers.


*PBV: is a proprietary metric that compares the cost of a program to the cost of other programs with the same (or a similar) qualitative score. It also compares the qualitative score of the program to the score of other programs with the same (or similar) cost. In short, the PBV calculation denotes the overall value – or 'bang for your buck' – of an online degree.
The enrollment process for Early College opportunities is determined by the time and location of the course. Regardless of what course you plan to take, every student must Apply to Bakersfield College in order to be assigned a BC ID number. Once you have an ID number, you will need to Complete an Update Form each semester, but you will not need to apply again.
There are plenty of degrees offered at Iowa State University, and many different options for online studies. The online college at Iowa State offers hundreds of different courses, as well as a number of fully online degree programs. Most of Iowa State's online degrees are graduate degrees, many of which can't be studied online at most other schools. For example, graduate students can study toward a master's degree in agronomy, plant breeding and seed technology & business online. However, even more popular options include their online engineering programs. Iowa State is also seen as one of the most affordable online schools to earn a master's degree. All courses are offered entirely online, and students can study both online and on-campus if they choose.
You can select a course and register through your Online Student Services account, which can be accessed through the myEdison® portal. If it is your first time registering for a course, watch this video for a step-by-step tutorial on how to search and select your first course in Online Student Services. If you chose the Per Credit Tuition Plan, Online Student Services is when you pay for those course’s credits.
Western Wyoming Community College (WWCC) serves Southwest Wyoming, but students in other areas of the state, and elsewhere, seeking an online education can also take advantage of the variety of online programs and courses WWCC has to offer. Two-year online degrees are offered in the areas of business, sociology, criminal justice, social work, social science, computer and office information systems and accounting. Through WyCLASS, students can also enroll in courses offered by other community colleges and universities across the state. Since WWCC has relationships and transfer agreements with several four-year colleges and universities, students can easily transfer after earning an associate degree online at WWCC, making it the most affordable option for those planning to pursue a bachelor's or master's degree. For students wanting to enter the workforce as soon as possible, WWCC has several online certification programs and on-campus short-format workforce development courses. Speaking of affordability, WWCC has several in-house scholarships to help further keep costs down.
In every year since 2000, the college enrollment rate for young adults was higher for females than for males. This pattern was observed for young adults overall and for White and Hispanic young adults specifically. For example, in 2017 the female-male gap in college enrollment rates was 7 percentage points for young adults overall, 7 percentage points for White young adults, and 10 percentage points for Hispanic young adults. Among Black young adults, the college enrollment rate was higher for females than for males in most years since 2000, except in 2007, 2012, 2015, and 2016, when the rates were not measurably different. In 2017, the female-male gap in college enrollment rates was 6 percentage points for Black young adults.
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